Posts Tagged ‘video marketing’

Corporate Video on the Road

October 3, 2012

The end of the calendar year brings corporate meetings of all kinds. In today’s visual world, a constant flow of intermittent video throughout the course of these lengthy gatherings ensures more interest and participation, which ultimately translates to greater success for hosting firms.

Enjoying fish soup in the Traveler’s Lounge in HKG Airport (Hong Kong).

As a full-service corporate video production company working in this world, autumn ushers in a heavy travel schedule for us at Voices & Visions Productions as we work this year in Australia, Hong Kong, France, Finland, and various cities in the US – all in a single month.

Success with a schedule as hectic as this requires a deep-seated knowledge of how to travel as lightly but completely as possible to ensure the video captured looks as beautiful as it does when we shoot in our home territory.  Another important factor in preventing plane and road burn out is knowing how to plan the travel experience on a limited budget, to ensure comfort and even playtime in the after-work hours (when they happen). Over the coming few weeks, I will write blogs that address a bunch of video tips on the heavily traversed road.

Where in the world…?

September 5, 2012

Who know where today’s Photo of the Week was taken?

 

Canal, photography, curt fissel, voices and visions, new jersey video production, new york video production, los angeles video production, professional video production company

See last week’s photo.

Optimizing Photos For SEO

August 31, 2012
The Facebook Timeline update and the increasing popularity of Instagram and Pinterest demonstrate how visual the marketing climate has become. A study by Skyword analyzed 78,000 pieces of content and found that articles containing at least one image saw an average of 70% more views than articles with text alone. It isn’t enough to just add a few photos, however, to ensure the maximum SEO power; the images must be fully optimized themselves. Here are a few key aspects of photo optimization for SEO:
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First, make sure that each image is saved as a .jpg or a .gif, as these are the preferred formats. Second, never use the default file name for a photo. Before uploading it to any blog or site, save the image with a name that is descriptive. If the photo is saved as GDB00002.jpg, for example, Google or other search engines will have no idea what  the image depicts. If it’s saved as beach-santa-monica.jpg, it will be seen as such by search engines.


Alternative Text (Alt Text)
Think of “alt text” as doubling down on keywords. There’s more space here to use more words, so pack it in with keywords that are relevant to the content. Google will read this and be able to paint a larger picture of what the photo actually is, which will increase the relevance of its search results.

Share on Social Sites
Publishing a piece of content used to be the final step in this process, but thanks to social media it is now just the beginning. After publishing a blog or press release, share it across as many social sites as possible. Facebook and Google+ in particular are important for SEO. Facebook should be obvious, as it is far and away the most popular social network, and photos are among the most shared content on the site. While Google+ doesn’t have the same volume of users, Google owns it. If optimization on this search engine is a priority, don’t write off Google+ .

Instagram users, please post your handles in the comments!
Follow our photos: @voicesvisions.

Photo Optimization Tip

August 29, 2012
This week’s tip for photo optimization comes from our marketing director, Lea:
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Never use the default file name for a photo. Before uploading an image to any blog or site, save it with a name that is descriptive. If the photo is saved as GDB00002.jpg, Google has no idea what the image depicts. If it’s saved as beach-santa-monica.jpg, it will be seen as such by search engines.
Tune in later this week for an in-depth discussion of photo optimization techniques.
See last week’s tip on video production.

Professional Videos Vs. DIY Videos

August 24, 2012
When Google bought YouTube in 2005, video on the web exploded, and sometimes it came in the form of pets walking across kitchen floors. For a short time, audiences became accustomed to amateur videos, which seemed to give license to uploading nonprofessional productions even as the face of companies and organizations. More recently, however, this impression has changed. Just as a DIY newsletter filled with grammatical errors and a disorganized presentation is not as effective as one created by professional writers, the viewing audience has come to appreciate the superior value brought by videos created by experts. There are several important details, often overlooked by amateurs, which separate a DIY video from one produced by a professional video production company.
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The setup before our shoot with the Riverside Company

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This is what the shot looked liked inside the camera

Lighting
Lighting is a delicate but crucial step in the interview process. Often shot in interviewees’ offices or corporate boardrooms, it is the Director of Photography’s job to “paint” with light, transforming a plain white room into an interesting and relevant interview space. For Curt Fissel, V&V’s seasoned DP with 30 years of experience, expert lighting is in his DNA. “I don’t like shots that are either over-lit or under-lit,” he says. “Poor lighting tenchniques will result in a longer time in post-production and even then may not yield the appearance sought.” Curt thinks proper lighting is often overlooked because today’s cameras can be so forgiving. Nonetheless, he believes lighting plays a vital role in separating a home movie appearance from a commercial video look.
Audio
When a video has good audio, most people don’t notice, but when sound is poor, it may be the most prominent aspect of the production that most people remember. While amateurs may become complacent with the abilities of editing equipment, professionals, like Curt, know a video is only as good as its audio. “Digital filters can help improve original audio recorded, but to ensure the sound is as pure as possible, it needs to be captured cleanly,” notes Curt.  This is the case whether one or multiple microphones are utilized on a particular shoot. To demonstrate the emphasis placed on audio amongst professionals, Curt recollected: “I went to a seminar years ago called Audio is more important than video, which I don’t quite agree with, but I do think they are close to being equally important.”
Depth of Storyline
The quality of an interview has a huge impact on the depth of the final video product. Writer and producer Ellen Friedland draws upon her journalistic background when preparing for an interview. “What’s crucial is to really understand the underlying concepts of what it is we’re videotaping,” Ellen begins. “If we go into a medical device company, I do a lot of research about that medical device. This way, even though I am not a scientist, I can prompt interviewees to share more profound points that will be reflected in the final piece.” Video production is, at its heart, storytelling.  Notes Ellen: “If the interviewer does not probe for a more multi-layered understanding of the subject, the story will have more of a superficial feel , often lacking a consistent thesis or message.“

How To Optimize YouTube Videos For SEO

July 30, 2012

According to studies conducted by the marketing research firm Forrester, sites with video are over 50 times more likely to appear on the first page of a Google search results page than those with text alone. Recognition of the value placed on video by Google probably accounts for the popularity of this form of media; a survey conducted by the Association of National Advertisers found that 80% of marketers are using video this year. Yet equally important to the proliferation of professional video is optimizing the productions  for search engine optimization (SEO) purposes.

Above is an example of a YouTube video we uploaded and optimized.

There are several key elements to optimizing marketing videos on YouTube which begin with the file name and description. The title should not only reflect the nature of the video, but it should have keywords that cause Google to pay attention. Additionally, posted videos should contain an accurate description of the content. to ensure that folks searching for this type of information find them.The reason keywords are so important is because Google can’t actually read the content of videos (yet!). Rather, the title and description of the video tell the search engines what it is about. The more accurate, content-rich and keyword-filled, the more information Google will be able to use in its optimization formula. Ever a step ahead, descriptions that are bombarded with random keywords put the videos with which they are associated in jeopardy.Another SEO clue is to provide a URL to a website – preferably the page where the video lives on the website – in the video description, creating a link between two respected sites. Significantly, when there is an increase in the number of locations to which content is uploaded, Google views the video as having more authority and ranks it higher.

The Tags section of the uploading process is where all the keywords that don’t weave smoothly into the description can be highlighted. Prospective clients and customers will search for products or services using specific words, which can be tagged. The tags should be separated with commas, and each should not be more than one or two words.

Finally, the video should be accurately categorized, and the visibility option should be set to “public.” These details may seem obvious, but they are often overlooked and can affect the reach of a video (or lack thereof)..

In addition to Youtube and website postings, videos should be posted across a wide range of social networks. Online communities should be encouraged to share them. Repostings on separate sites increase the authority of the material in the eyes of Google and Bing.

Video SEO Tip

July 25, 2012

This week’s tip comes from our Marketing Director, Lea:lea spencer, voices and visions, new jersey video production, new york video production, video sep, video marketing

In addition to Youtube and website postings, videos should be posted across a wide range of social networks. Online communities should be encouraged to share them. Repostings on separate sites increase the authority of the material in the eyes of Google and Bing.

Tune in Monday for a full discussion on how to properly optimize videos for Search Engine Optimization.

 

See last week’s tip.

The Evolution of Video Production, Part 2

July 23, 2012
As the video industry continues to evolve at an exponential rate, it becomes increasingly important for video production houses to stay ahead of the curve. Evolving with the market is no easy trick, but it’s also not a foreign concept to Voices & Visions’ principals Ellen Friedland and Curt Fissel, who’ve been in the business since the nineties. They’ve successfully made the switches from linear to digital and from SD to HD, and they are excited about the latest turn: video going social. video production new jersey, video production new york, curt fissel, ellen friedland, voices and visions, corporate video production
As an active user of LinkedIn since its inception, Ellen names it as her top network, stating, “I listen to a lot of conversations happening on LinkedIn and read articles showcasing statistics about everything related to video, which keeps me up to date on trends in the industry.” Ellen uses this information to inform her conversations with clients. “We make sure that what we do and what our clients do is in harmony with the latest marketing information related to video,” she says.
A big influencer in the social video world is YouTube, and since it is owned by Google, it serves as its own search engine for video. “Google values quality and substance in its text and videos,”  Ellen notes. “Pre-Google’s ownership of Youtube, home videos of people’s dogs walking across the floor were acceptable, and even companies grew accustomed to the unprofessional nature of many of the video postings. Today people recognize that they need to have professional videos.” The quality of the videos is not the only trend Ellen has noticed Google preferring; she believes the quantity of videos matters as well. “It’s my understanding that Google pays attention to sites that post numerous substantive videos,” she tells clients. She adds that additional videos need not multiply the costs of production. Says Ellen: “The amount of video captured and the time spent editing may be the same whether one longer video or several shorter videos are produced.”
This shift to shorter, more numerous videos is just another in a long line of industry transformations for Voices & Visions’ senior editor, Curt, who considers the changes all part of the job. He names professional seminars, conferences and active involvement in user groups as his primary sources of information gathering. While these activites are very time-consuming, Curt recognizes that, “this is the profession I’ve chosen to immerse myself in, and I want to stay on top of it.” His reference to staying current is focused on both the changing styles of video production as well as  the software editors use to produce them.
After the switch from linear to digital, Curt became proficient on the AVID editing system, which he used for 10 years. Several years ago he made the switch to, Final Cut Pro, to which he now feels a strong alliance. “The ease of Final Cut Pro, when working with a Mac, made the transition necessary,” he says. Curt is, however, open-minded to ever-new technologies, which is how he’s been able to stay ahead of the game.
At the most recent National Association of Broadcasters conference, it became clear that industry choices have expanded to include other systems, like Adobe Premiere. Curt appreciates the creativity of all the new offerings and never opposes adopting new software that improves on the old.
Conferences like the annual NAB and sites like LinkedIn help small businesses to gain footing in the never-ending tidal waves of industry shifts.. But that’s not enough; it also takes a willingness – and excitement — to be ready to learn and implement the next best products and services.
Read Video Production, Part 1

Creating Harmony in the Workplace

July 9, 2012
It’s been said that one can win more bees with honey, but in the case of workplace harmony, concerning oneself with the happiness of the team can be just as crucial to the bottom line. According to the Detroit Free Press, since October 2008, the stocks of public companies scoring in the top 10% in employee satisfaction outperformed the S&P’s 500 by 15.5%, but how did they do it?
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For Voices & Visions chief producer, Ellen Friedland, the key to a happy office begins with respect. “No job is more important than another job. All of them are parts of the whole and everyone needs to respect the work of others,” said Ellen. V&V is a small business and relies heavily on the production of a few staff members for the success of the company. She believes an employer can and must create an environment where people want to work. “That means an environment of understanding that the team is comprised of individuals who have personal lives that are important to them,” she said, also stressing the importance of injecting a little humor into the day-to-day operations.
Krystal Sancho, Director of Operations for Voices & Visions, rates happiness at the top of her list, stating, “It’s probably my number one thing: being happy at my job.” Krystal, who left her last workplace due to disharmony in the office, believes happiness plays a big role in how much effort people put in. “If you’re in an environment where you’re not being treated well, you’re just not going to work as hard,” she said.
Some jobs are more demanding than others. Chief editor Curt Fissel, who comes from a news background, is used to working under stress and has learned to cope with it well. “I always give 100%. Under stress, I work fine. I don’t like it, but I manage,” he said. Curt’s experience has made him empathetic toward those he oversees. “There’s nothing worse than having to deal with stress on top of having to manage multiple tasks,” he said, including that he knows how hard everyone on his team works. Curt says he tries to create the kind of atmosphere where people feel welcome and supported. Ellen mirrors this sentiment: “I think when people work in this kind of environment, they enjoy being here and they want to be a part of our team,” she said.
Small companies with fewer staff sometimes need employees to step outside of specific job descriptions and put on other hats for the benefit of the greater entity. Krystal says the genuine relationships formed at Voices & Visions makes her much more likely to help out on a night or weekend. “We consider ourselves a family here,” she said. “Ellen and Curt make us feel as comfortable here as clients who come in for meetings or editing sessions.” And that makes all the workplace difference.