Posts Tagged ‘social media’

The Evolution of Video Production, Part 2

July 23, 2012
As the video industry continues to evolve at an exponential rate, it becomes increasingly important for video production houses to stay ahead of the curve. Evolving with the market is no easy trick, but it’s also not a foreign concept to Voices & Visions’ principals Ellen Friedland and Curt Fissel, who’ve been in the business since the nineties. They’ve successfully made the switches from linear to digital and from SD to HD, and they are excited about the latest turn: video going social. video production new jersey, video production new york, curt fissel, ellen friedland, voices and visions, corporate video production
As an active user of LinkedIn since its inception, Ellen names it as her top network, stating, “I listen to a lot of conversations happening on LinkedIn and read articles showcasing statistics about everything related to video, which keeps me up to date on trends in the industry.” Ellen uses this information to inform her conversations with clients. “We make sure that what we do and what our clients do is in harmony with the latest marketing information related to video,” she says.
A big influencer in the social video world is YouTube, and since it is owned by Google, it serves as its own search engine for video. “Google values quality and substance in its text and videos,”  Ellen notes. “Pre-Google’s ownership of Youtube, home videos of people’s dogs walking across the floor were acceptable, and even companies grew accustomed to the unprofessional nature of many of the video postings. Today people recognize that they need to have professional videos.” The quality of the videos is not the only trend Ellen has noticed Google preferring; she believes the quantity of videos matters as well. “It’s my understanding that Google pays attention to sites that post numerous substantive videos,” she tells clients. She adds that additional videos need not multiply the costs of production. Says Ellen: “The amount of video captured and the time spent editing may be the same whether one longer video or several shorter videos are produced.”
This shift to shorter, more numerous videos is just another in a long line of industry transformations for Voices & Visions’ senior editor, Curt, who considers the changes all part of the job. He names professional seminars, conferences and active involvement in user groups as his primary sources of information gathering. While these activites are very time-consuming, Curt recognizes that, “this is the profession I’ve chosen to immerse myself in, and I want to stay on top of it.” His reference to staying current is focused on both the changing styles of video production as well as  the software editors use to produce them.
After the switch from linear to digital, Curt became proficient on the AVID editing system, which he used for 10 years. Several years ago he made the switch to, Final Cut Pro, to which he now feels a strong alliance. “The ease of Final Cut Pro, when working with a Mac, made the transition necessary,” he says. Curt is, however, open-minded to ever-new technologies, which is how he’s been able to stay ahead of the game.
At the most recent National Association of Broadcasters conference, it became clear that industry choices have expanded to include other systems, like Adobe Premiere. Curt appreciates the creativity of all the new offerings and never opposes adopting new software that improves on the old.
Conferences like the annual NAB and sites like LinkedIn help small businesses to gain footing in the never-ending tidal waves of industry shifts.. But that’s not enough; it also takes a willingness – and excitement — to be ready to learn and implement the next best products and services.
Read Video Production, Part 1

Tip of the Week

July 19, 2012
This week’s tip comes from our writer and producer, Ellen:
ellen friedland, voices and visions, new jersey video production, new york video production
When traveling to other cultures, learn about the culture to which you’re traveling:
Back in 1995, when we were doing a lot of work in Poland, I went to the store and bought a Polish language audio cassette. I decided if I was going to be in Poland, I needed to know certain words and expressions: Thank you, please, where is the bathroom, right, left, straight. After many rewinds, I learned some of the basics, which made it so much easier to get around. People also responded more helpfully and enthusiastically because they realized I was trying to take part in their culture.

The Evolution of Video Production, Part 1

July 17, 2012
It seems that humans have always possessed desire to record events: from cave drawings to great artistic masterpieces, to photographs and motion pictures. This need to convey stories has evolved with technological innovation, presenting ever-new opportunities for industries in the storytelling business. Corporate video production, of course, is one such  industry.
curt fissel, ellen friedland, voices and visions productions, new jersey video production, new york video production, video marketing, professional video production
“This has been an extremely challenging industry as there have been a number of huge shifts: first from the linear world to the digital world,” said V&V’s Chief Producer Ellen Friedland, referring to the days when editing a video for clients meant only two options in transitions: cuts and dissolves (generated with special machinery). “Digital editing is a completely different ballgame than linear editing was and required completely new skills,” said Ellen, who relied on V&V Senior Editor, Curt Fissel, to master the new possibilities.
Evolving with the changing technology has been an ever-present theme throughout Curt’s career. “When I started in television news, we were shooting 16mm film and we literally had to cut the film,” he said. “At V&V we moved over from linear editing in 1998, which is when we got our first AVID editing system.” The next big shift in editing came with the jump from standard-definition video (SD) to high-definition video (HD). That was when Curt leapt into a then-newer new technology: Final Cut Pro. “The ease of Final Cut Pro, when working from a Mac, made the transition necessary,” he said, demonstrating another defining personality characteristic: the ability to adapt.
new jersey video production, new york video production, video editing, post production, curt fissel The Internet also played a major role in shifting the landscape of the video production industry. Says Ellen: “In 2005, which was the year that Google bought YouTube, everyone began to recognize that video would have a real place on the web.” As we know, this did not necessarily mean that professionally produced videos would be highly valued. In fact, the high volume of unprofessional videos initially made it harder on professional video houses. “For a little while there was a sense of ‘DIY videos are fine’,” Ellen said. “But now people recognize the value of professional created video products.” Ellen credits this in part to Google’s evolving algorithms, which rank  substantive videos higher in search results.
Curt offered this colorful metaphor with regard to DIY videos: “You can run a coat hanger down a stuck drain, or you can call a plumber. Same thing with video production.” With the constant evolutions in technology and marketing, it pays to find professionals who are committed to staying ahead of the curve. “It’s really important to be aware of where the industry is transitioning and to be knowledgeable and equipped to move in those directions,” said Curt.  “It will never be stationary.”

Read Video Production, Part 2