Archive for the ‘video production’ Category

Video Challenge: Helping the Sales Team Make Software Products Catchy

September 18, 2014

In a business world populated by countless organizations relying on seas of software programs to achieve unlimited goals, breaking through the competitive landscape with a new offering is a very difficult task. It requires a sales team with a belief in and knowledge about the product at hand, enthusiasm, persistence – and a tool kit. While the box of assistance is likely to contain virtual demo programs, its effectiveness initially requires a simple and easily comprehensible explanation about the unique uses and value of the software. This messaging and its presentation is the key to getting the potential buyer to stop, listen for a moment amidst the constant hum of information, and peek in at the opportunity. It is also a challenging task that recently landed on our doorstep.

Among its diverse offering of amenities designed to meet the ever-changing business world, our client Ricoh has been providing IT services to the legal industry for over 20 years, including comprehensive document resources. One of its recent software products in this department is called REDI (Ricoh Electronic Discovery Insight). When installed in a company’s server, REDI enables a user to retrieve information through a simple-to-use search system, saving the company a lot of time and money in completing discovery requests.

To reign in new customers, the REDI group wanted to begin the sales process with a short and catchy video, which brought our video production team into the discussion. After reviewing the department’s written materials and getting walked through a demonstration of the software, we were convinced that explanations of its uses and benefits recited on-camera by programmers, executive staff, or professional voiceover artists would be too wordy to be impactful. This was particularly so when the topic precluded visual imagery to sprinkle over their sound bites.

Instead, we opted for a high-energy, visually appealing, and originally created kinetic typography video. V&V worked with the REDI team to understand the software in its minutiae, then to translate that knowledge into short, easily comprehensible phrases. Integrating the simple text with Ricoh branding, REDI screen imagery, a catchy melody, and creative motion, the alluring end product is causing heads to turn in REDI’s direction.

And that is its objective. Once a prospective customer pays attention to the introduction, the door opens to a demonstration of the product. That, I am convinced, will sell itself to companies inclined to improving their litigation strategies and defending against overly burdensome legal discovery requests.

An Italian Adventure to Produce a Video Profile of a Private Equity Portfolio Company

February 13, 2014

The opportunity to produce a video profile of a company in a portfolio of our global private equity client The Riverside Company often takes Curt (director of photography) and I (producer) on interesting adventures. Two weeks ago, for instance, we had the opportunity to spend a day in Verona, Italy filming Olympics and World Championship swimmers who endorse the racing swimwear of the brand Arena, a company in Riverside’s European fund.

As I watched Ruta Meilutyte (Lithuania, 16 years old) and Daniel Gyurta (Hungary, 24) fly through the lanes of the Olympics-sized pool while testing out the latest carbon technology that has been incorporated into their suits, I imagined them standing on a podium, gold medal in hand, filled with emotions as the national anthems of their home countries blasted into the ears of the world after their wins. They and their World Championship gold medal colleague Katinka Hosszu (Hungary, 24), who was also present in Verona, are international stars, revered by swimmers, athletes, and ordinary people who delight in the extraordinary talents of superpeople. During international events like the Olympics or the World Championships, they live in a bubble of fame surrounded by countless other swimmers and coaches, reporters and fans. But on the day we videotaped, there was almost no one around but the folks from Arena and us, and we were treated to a slice of time with these wonders of the world.

 

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Curt was excited to use a GoPro to capture them from the underwater perspective. Attaching the camera to the end of a long stick, he walked down the perimeter of the pool holding one end, ensuring that the camera at the other end stayed beneath the swimmers’ bellies as they glided effortlessly through the pool lanes adjacent to him. His footage highlighted their perfect underwater moves — as well as the brand name of the company they endorse. Adding to the value of the video, we also spent time interviewing the Olympians, a formality that was preceded and followed by normal conversation. I was excited to learn that Katinka – and her coach/husband Shane Tusup – went to USC, my daughter’s alma mater. Most impressively, all three of the swimmers were very humble, friendly people simply doing what they love to do and fortunate to be so successful at it.

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We spent that day in the closed confines of an indoor pool facility which could have been located anywhere in the world, but when we finished recording the interviews and b-roll, we had two free days until the next planned day of shooting. We spent a sunny morning at the Adriatic Sea, and another day driving on little roads that traverse tiny towns with stone buildings that have been standing for centuries. In these non-tourist locations, I ate the freshest and most delicious Italian veggie food I’ve ever tried. A special treat was stopping for lunch one day to meet our friend Ruth Ellen Gruber, an award-winning writer and journalist who lives near Todi. She gifted us with a can of oil pressed from olives she had picked in her garden. I’m quite sure I will never be able to enjoy store-bought olive oil again.

A couple of days later we were back under the Arena wing. Katinka stopped by the company’s headquarters in Tolentino to meet the staff and learn about new products. It was fun to see her surrounded by scores of staff asking for her autograph. She chatted with them, one at a time, writing personal messages on the postcards they handed her. We also enjoyed watching her delight in the panoply of Arena products that filled the company’s headquarters, examining the fabrics of swimsuits, trying on new goggles, and picking out her favorite sports bag.

As Cristiano Portas, the company’s CEO told us when we interviewed him later in the day: “We want to fully understand the needs, the wishes and even the dreams of the athletes and to transfer this knowledge into products which are delivering an outstanding performance. The concept is that all the people watching the competition and going to the shops to get the swimwear or a pair of goggles, they will see the champions and they want to wear the goggles and the swimsuits of the champions because if it is good for champions, it is good for me.”

Very cool to have such incredibly talented and down-to-earth folks as brand champions for millions of people to emulate in countries around the globe.

As for the video, we are having a very good time in the editing suite. We get to ooh and aah over footage of perfect strokes of several of the world’s most talented swimmers. We even get to act as surrogate coaches in a way, choosing where to start and stop each beautiful shot.  Editing this company profile (as all videos we produce), we are ever mindful of its ultimate audience – the Riverside investors and others interested in the firm’s portfolio of companies. I am certain they will be very pleased to be a part of such an exciting and successful venture.

 

 

 

NYC Bar Association Panel: From Lawyer to Entrepreneur

December 19, 2013

One of the most fun aspects about being an entrepreneur is the opportunity to live in a number of different and challenging roles on a daily basis.

Some hours each day I am a producer of corporate video productions and documentaries, figuring out and implementing countless logistics of a broad range of projects. Other hours I am a writer, crafting the scripts and storyboards on which the productions are built. Sometimes I am a researcher, diving into the substance of clients’ businesses to ensure that the videos we are creating accurately reflect the nature of the organizations. Importantly, I am often the head of marketing and sales, seeking prospective clients to keep the business engine humming. Whenever I find a few free moments, I become the chief dreamer, configuring new ideas to improve or change my current businesses – or create new ones. And of course, I’m also the “baker and candlestick maker” (never a butcher – I’m a vegetarian!) for all the behind-the-scenes details that make the businesses run.

A break during a documentary shoot in Paris

Equally as exciting for me, last week I had the opportunity to put on my “entrepreneur” hat and speak on a panel at the NYC Bar Association (NYCBA) entitled “Lawyer to Entrepreneur.” The forum, organized by Emilia Roll of the NYCBA’s Career Advancement and Management Committee, was billed as an opportunity to “Come and learn from successful entrepreneurs about their paths from practicing law to running their own businesses and how they are using their ‘lawyer’ skills to advance.”

I am very lucky to love all the hats I wear, and the entrepreneurial one is at the top of the list. I have been a part of a number of entrepreneurial groups with different foci, and I almost always find that the commonalities between entrepreneurs outweigh huge differences in industries, markets, and strategies. There are unstated understandings, shared experiences and generous support systems that fuel the passion to take multiple business endeavors to the ever-next level.

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NYC Bar Association

That was certainly the experience for me on the panel last week. I was privileged to be joined by George Tsiatis of Group 113 and The Resolution Project, Rosena Sammi of Rosena Sammi Jewelry, Diana St. Louis of Bijte, Brian Trunzo of Carson Street Clothiers, and Suzie Scanlon of Bliss Lawyers. As I answered questions relating to the benefits of having a legal background as a jumping off point to becoming a businessperson/producer/writer/researcher/marketer/dreamer/baker/candlestick maker, it was inspirational to hear about my co-panelists’ paths, businesses, challenges, solutions, and ideas. It was also exciting to engage in discussions with an audience of lawyers poised on the verge of considering their business dreams. The experience was a reminder of the journey taken thus far, the never-ending possibilities offered by the entrepreneurial road, and the value of enjoying every step along the way.

Now back to a producer review of the latest draft video for a private equity client…

In Tokyo, sharing a real corporate video shoot with a fictional character

November 5, 2013

In one of the climax scenes of the novel 1Q84, the protagonist Aomame goes to Hotel Okura in Tokyo. She is moments away from a foreboding encounter to which an Alice in Wonderland series of events has been tensely building. Despite evidencing a personality that combines inner strength, courage, integrity, and selective sensitivity, Aomame feels an uncharacteristic apprehension, perceiving the unexpected presence of an undefined and potent hand of fate at work. She waits in the oversized, opulent lobby for an escort who will bring her to the room where her antagonist will be waiting.  Alone amidst a crowded diversity of people moving to the buzz of unlimited agendas, her mind skirts between its very rational and methodical proclivity and the nonsensical world that has somehow crept into her life.

I write this on an airplane, three hours away from landing in Japan’s Narita Airport for a corporate video shoot. I am here with Curt, my husband who is a director of photography for our company Voices & Visions Productions. This will be our second trip to Tokyo, so its sprawling urban landscape will not come as a surprise. On our last trip we had dinner one night on the top floor of our hotel and were seated at a table next to a large window overlooking the city. Actually, it was only a wedge of the city. Yet I remember thinking that the vision before us spread inescapably to the horizon, harboring within its dense mass infinite numbers of people and offices and stores and restaurants and everything. Like hotels.

When the logistics of this current trip to Tokyo were being planned, the office manager of our business client offered to reserve a room in the hotel where they have a corporate rate located a block away from their workplace. Eliminating for us the daunting task of choosing between countless hotels in the complex grid of Tokyo neighborhoods, we took them up on their kind gesture, then received the e-confirmation for a room at Hotel Okura.

lobby of Hotel Okura

lobby of Hotel Okura

 

I was reminded of Rick’s line about Ilsa in Casablanca: Of all the gin joints, in all the towns, in all the world, she walks into mine.” Of all the thousands of hotels in Tokyo, our client booked us in the one where this pivotal moment in the best book I’ve read in years takes place.

I am a big fan of Haruki Murakami, the author of 1Q84, and especially of this particular book. It took me weeks to finish the 1,200-page odyssey since I am often working until after midnight, leaving me exhausted when I lay down in bed at night and open a book. For the first third or so, I read two chapters a night, but by the time I got to the middle of the book, my appetite for the plot grew voracious. Each night after I closed the book, the characters and plot danced through my dwindling consciousness into my dreams. They would fade into the paper of the book’s pages through most of the daytime hours when the real world of documentary and corporate video production would dominate my brain. In other words, like Aomame in that pivotal scene, the book transported me to a mental place of vacillation between the real world and the fictional world of Murakami.

It’s been a few months since I finished reading 1Q84, and some of its details have begun dissolving from my memory like the ending slate of a video we create. As the long United Airlines flight to Murakami’s city approaches our destination, my mind is transitioning into the concrete producer/writer roles in which I feel comfortable. But I confess that, immersed in the setting of Hotel Okura, I will not be able to avoid looking out for the imaginary Aomame and the ominous meeting she has in a room that may be located down the hall from the one where we will be camping out the next four days.

Fortunately the nature of our work is creative, so the influence of imagination in video storytelling – as much for a corporate marketing video as any other type – promises to be beneficial.

 

Video for Private Equity Annual Investor Meetings

May 28, 2013

This is the time of year when many PE companies and PE divisions of larger companies are designing the content and activities of year-end annual investor meetings. Significantly, few industries are as friendly to the fashionable storytelling tool of video as private equity. Each portfolio company brings an engaging narrative of its roots that flourished over time and are expanding as a result of the vision, strategies and assistance brought by its private equity partner. Producing high-end and fast-paced yet short and comprehensive videos to showcase examples of companies in a portfolio that are encountering success is a great way to convey the information, break up the pace of the meeting in a popular and pleasing way, and encourage participation in future funds the PE firm will roll out.

The themes of the videos will depend upon the emphases of the companies or divisions. There is no one formula; decisions are tailored to the firms and their investor audiences. Here are some examples of videos created for The Riverside Company, the largest global firm investing in the middle market, for their 2012 Annual Investor Conference. The goal of these videos was to highlight the different funds:

North American Fund Portfolio Company: Baby Jogger

European Fund Portfolio Company: Reima 

Asia-Pac Fund Portfolio Company: Learning Seat 

North American Microcap Fund Portfolio Company: Yourmembership.com  

V&V has been working in PE and related industries for over a decade with clients such as The Riverside Company, the former AIG Investments, Private Equity Investor, and Duane Morris LLP. We also count as our clients pension funds investing in PE such as the Texas Teachers Retirement System.

Please contact us to brainstorm ideas about ways in which video can provide added value to your annual investor meeting.

NAB Show: Day 2

April 10, 2013


Day two in the Nevada desert, and the NAB Show is up and running at full speed. My focus today was post-production content editing software. The big players here in the South Hall are AVID and Adobe Premiere, with a field of smaller companies having set up tent as well. Notably absent from the floor as usual is Apple and its content editing software platform, Final Cut Pro X.

I began digital storytelling at Voices & Visions Productions using AVID on a Power MAC 9600 in the late 1990s. I was an avid AVID user until about eight years ago when I switched to Final Cut Pro 7 based on advancements that system offered, so I was curious to spend the first part of my day today at the AVID exhibit. AVID has a proven track record of innovation. Many of the content producers here still recognize it as the industry standard.

avid, NAB Show, Las Vegas, video production, corporate video production

Avids’ exhibit area on the South Hall upper level at this years NAB Show

Traditionally manufacturers use the NAB venue for making announcements about their latest upgrades, and AVID did not disappoint, announcing audio and performance upgrades to its arsenal. Enhancements include a fully redesigned audio engine with a new 64-bit architecture, expanded metering and a direct HD video workflow. The new technologies are successfully luring back some former AVID editors who, like me, had made the switch to Final Cut Pro 7, but fell off the Apple cheerleading squad when the FCP X (ten), less professional-friendly system, was introduced two years ago.

The FCP X launch took place in Las Vegas at the same time as the NAB, but in a separate venue (sigh), and was met with a cool reception. Among the devoted FCP 7 users with whom I have been chatting this week, there are some who have switched away from Apple’s FCP platform, others who are still considering alternatives to FCP X, those who have decided to embrace it, and a group who takes the approach of fluency across all systems.

avid, NAB Show, Las Vegas, video production, corporate video production

Adobe’s exhibit are on the South Hall lower level at this years NAB Show.

Following the tradition of announcing new innovations at the NAB, Adobe introduced Adobe®Anywhere, a collaborative workflow platform that enables editors using Adobe professional video tools to work together, allowing access and management of centralized media and assets across almost any network. This program works well with the Adobe Cloud introduced last year, which allowsusers to access all of the relevant software for one monthly fee. Updates are free, and the workflow is fully integrated, making content flow seamlessly streamlined. Adobe’s price structure for the package makes it a creative powerful suite of production tools worth considering.

Tonight is the Final Cut Pro Users Super-Meet. The event is an evening long gathering of some very creative storytellers exploring the latest innovations and industry trends.

 A few NAB notes as of noon today:

There were over 4200 tweets by @NABShow

There were almost 22,000 followers of @NABShow

@NABShow had a total reach of over 10,700,000

The Miraculous Reality of Fair Trade Coffee Farming

March 11, 2013

Our first trip to Mirembe Kawomera (“Delicious Peace”) Coffee Co-op, located in the village of Namanyoni on the outskirts of Mbale, Uganda, was in 2006. The co-op had been founded just two years earlier, the idea of regional leader JJ Keki who sought a market for local farmers’ coffee as well as a way to overcome historical religious-based intolerance. A year after their establishment – also a year before our arrival – they had signed a deal with Fair Trade coffee buyer/roaster/seller Thanksgiving Coffee Company in Fort Bragg, CA.

We went there as a film production team with the goal of creating a documentary about this inspirational farming collective. Still only one year into their arrangement with Thanksgiving, they had just begun selling a small amount of coffee; the first shipment was a single shipping container. We spent several days becoming acquainted with the farmers, and they opened up to us, inviting us into their homes and lives.

One farmer housed 25 children. Only a fraction of those were biologically related; the others were children of parents who had died of AIDS or other causes, or who were otherwise unable to take care of them. Another farmer showed us the graves of three of his children who had passed away, all from malaria. He did not have money to take care of many of the nutritional needs of his extended family, including children and grandchildren. Everyone complained about a lack of funds to send their kids to school. While public schools exist, families are required to pay for books, uniforms and school lunches – an impossibility for many who are poverty stricken.

Simply put, the needs were overwhelming.

And yet, the farmers had been fortunate to find a Fair Trade buyer. Fair Trade guarantees a minimum and fair price, despite the international fluctuation of this commodity market. It also enables farmers to receive a second payment if the quality of the coffee is very good. Mandating egalitarianism and democracy on co-op boards and in the general running of the organization, Fair Trade additionally gives farming cooperatives a “social premium,” enabling them to support local community projects.

fair trade, coffee, uganda, mbala, africa, farmers, documentary, nonprofit

I write this now from Mbale, where we have spent the last five days with the Mirembe Kawomera farmers. It is almost seven years since our first visit. The school-age children of the farmer whose residence was home to 25 now all attend educational institutions. The farmer whose children suffered from unhealthy diets talked about his new-found knowledge of the four food groups, and how his large family is conscious of – and able to – partake in that diet on a daily basis. He has a new home that is covered with an iron roof to keep out the rain rather than the thatched roof that leaked, and his house even has some furniture. Not one farmer complained that his or her children were not able to attend school. And the co-op used its social premium to help build a new wing on a local public school that had become overcrowded.

When I asked the farmers to tell me about problems the co-op still has, each one – interviewed independently — answered the same thing: A thief broke into their warehouse and stole 15 bags of coffee.

Of course, that is awful – every bag represents a huge expenditure of hard work as well as profits. But then, thieves are everywhere. There was no additional complaint.

Pretty good support for the value of Fair Trade. And an important reminder to consumers who have buying choices that not only satisfy their caffeine longings but also have the ability to change individual lives.

My job – when I work on a documentary — is to be a producer, not a marketer. I look for objective facts. In this instance, the argument for the benefit of Fair Trade could not have been more compelling.

Returning to Uganda

March 4, 2013

 

I remember the first full day of our initial trip to Uganda in October 2006 to produce a documentary about Mirembe Kawomera (“Delicious Peace”) Coffee Co-op. After three days of travel (one from NY to Europe, the second from there to Entebbe Airport, and the third by car up to the Mbale region), we enthusiastically showed up at the entrance of the coffee co-op’s clay-constructed storefront. We were eager to meet the legendary farmers who had formed a collective to bridge interfaith differences and generate economic development through a Fair Trade partnership with California-based buyer, roaster and seller Thanksgiving Coffee Company. Since we had been in touch via email for several months and the executive board had invited us to come, we were ready to break out the cameras following the handshakes and dive into work. Instead, the farmers asked that we sit down for a four-hour meeting that began with the question: “Why should we let you do this?”

At that moment, Curt looked at me and said, “You are the attorney. You can negotiate this. I’m going outside to take pictures. They may be the last ones we get!”


delicious peace, documentary, coffee, fair trade, Uganda

Now here it is, six and a half years after that meeting and three years after the premiere screening of Delicious Peace Grows in a Ugandan Coffee Bean, and we are returning in two weeks for our fifth trip, this time (as the last) with a group of friends in tow.  Dual goals motivate this journey: (1) adding an extra 15-20 minutes of footage for a one-hour TV release focused on co-op updates and the impact of climate change on the farmers’ crops, and (2) introducing more American consumers to the work of the Mirembe Kawomera co-op, helping to spread awareness about their truly delicious coffee and the myriad families whose lives orbit around it.

In many respects, the first aim parallels corporate video production shoots we do around the world for many clients. We have done our homework and know what we want to record, all the necessary equipment is packed and ready to go, a basic schedule is in place, and we have the contact information for folks who will be crucial data-providers.

This assignment, however, comes with advance bonuses. We already have established friendships with farmers in the co-op, who are excited to help with the new phase of the project by devoting days of time when we are present to providing assistance; they understand and appreciate our role in helping to publicize their messages. And – New Yorkers — you know that excited feeling of being with out-of-towners who arrive in New York for the first time and stand in transcendental wonderment upon their initial ascent out of the subway? We will have the opportunity to experience that feeling through the eyes of our trip participants, multiple-fold, beginning with the moment our friend/tourguide Samson drives our group out of the airport onto the streets of Entebbe.

delicious peace, documentary, coffee, Uganda, fair trade

In response to the farmers’ initial question in 2006, I promised a long-term, mutual partnership in which success would be shared. I promised we would produce, complete, and screen the documentary. I said this would be an important avenue to spread the message of the work they are doing to bridge interfaith differences and educate coffee consumers about the hard work of farmers dedicated to specialty coffee production so that purchasing decisions reflect that knowledge. I told them that a successful documentary will trigger interest in their coffee. I told them that we have always established long-term friendships with the people who are the subjects of documentaries we undertake – as we have often done with our corporate video production clients.

Almost seven years later, the documentary has screened (and continues to do so) at over 35 international film festivals with a TV debut in the near future. We have partnered with a distributor committed to creating local educational “Peace Party” screenings around the country. Countless people have watched the program and learned about the important work of the farmers – many are busy talking about it on social media avenues everyday. And we are going back again to visit our friends and continue to develop the informational base.

We’re grateful the farmers took a leap of faith with us and proud to have earned their trust. Uganda, here we come!

 

Telling Stories With Video

February 27, 2013

Every corporation is built and sustained by individuals with stories to tell, and those stories can be effective marketing devices. (See “Endless Stories” blog.) Using internet video to tell those stories is particularly impactful: Audiences today watch more than they read, and the place they watch most is online. Consequently, introducing staff via video posted to websites and other online venues gives current and prospective customers a more personal – and therefore positive — feel for the companies with which they are or could be doing business.

One way of ensuring that online videos of staff are up-to-date, reflecting changes in personnel as well as the positions they occupy, is for corporations to build in-house video production studios designed for recording simple sound bites. The existence of such facilities at a company would enable each new hire  immediately  to record and post a video bio introducing himself or herself to the client base and the rest of the staff – or to record something else highlighting personality traits or interests, excitement about the company or its product, etc.  — depending upon the corporate culture. The initial investment in the studio is returned in the ability to inexpensively produce endless short and effectual videos.  


Once videos are edited, companies should consider posting them first on their own Youtube channels, then using those links to post them on their firms’ websites and other social media sites. This methodology will help boost  search engine optimization. YouTube is the second-largest search engine after Google and Google owns YouTube, so enhancing a corporate presence on this social network is important. There are several key elements to optimizing videos on YouTube, which will greatly influence the rankings and quality of search results. Saving video files with keywords as well as tagging keywords when uploading videos are two important pieces to a much more complicated puzzle. (For more pieces, see post on Video SEO).

Designing In-House Corporate Video Studios

February 11, 2013

An in-house corporate video studio sans extra hires: the perfect solution for a constant and affordable flow of new video content with a professional look.

A little over a year ago Cisco predicted that within three years (now one and three quarters) all Internet traffic will be video. While that may be an overly ambitious timeline, there is no question that video is overtaking the web as the communication vehicle through which companies are (and increasingly will be) required to express themselves. It is also by now recognized that the DIY videos that seemed acceptable when Youtube first burst on the scene in 2005 are not professional reflections of the entities they represent. These facts are part of the larger shifting landscape of corporate messaging, mandating creative responses and re-created budgetary line items.

Among the most resourceful recent solutions to this conundrum on which we have had the opportunity to work came at the request of our client EisnerAmper, one of the largest accounting firms in the US, with almost 1,300 employees. Working with clients hailing from a broad spectrum of industries and providing a range of services, EisnerAmper has unlimited topics to discuss on a regular basis, for which ever-new online video posts would be a great asset.  When their expansion induced them to move their New Jersey headquarters into a new space subject to complete redesign, they contacted us about helping them build a studio for the purpose of recording simple sound bite videos as frequently as desired, then turning them around for rapid posting to their website and other online sites.

Basic keys to success of this project included designing the space effectively and efficiently; properly laying out the IT, lighting, audio and other technical needs; identifying high-end equipment on which non-professionals can be trained; and providing the training. The exercise requires a combined knowledge of professional cinematography with relevant engineering and architectural understanding.
corporate video studio, corporate video, corporate video production, corporate video nj, video production, nyc, los angeles
Our VP Curt Fissel met with the EisnerAmper marketing team to determine their wish list of video needs and goals within the context of the available space dimensions. He also spoke with the project manager and architect. Curt is our Director of Photography and Senior Editor. At heart, he is an artist and a complex model builder, so the opportunity to work on the video studio enabled him to combine a lifetime of personal strengths. Curt used a soft polymer clay that hardens when baked to design a model of the room to scale. Even the tiniest details were highlighted in the model he created, such as the precise placement of the electrical outlets on the walls and the track lighting across the ceiling. Curt then photographed the model from many angles, pasting the images into a document onto which he wrote technical explanations of the requirements.

As the project moves forward, Curt will be available for ensuing needs, such as helping EisnerAmper choose appropriate equipment; configure all the studio elements to enable the production of optimum appearance; and teach staff who will be assigned to this job how to use the gear, which is intended to stay locked into place. Upon the conclusion of videotaping, EisnerAmper will have the ability to edit the material in-house or upload it to a cloud accessible by an off-site editor.

The video studio will enable EisnerAmper to produce and post constantly changing, simple and professional-looking talking-head videos responsive to the news of the day or even the hour, as well as a litany of additional information the firm would like to share – all at no extra cost for field (and possibly post) production once the set-up is in place. While their totality of video needs will also undoubtedly require more complex productions utilizing the help of professional corporate video producers, the use of the studio will ensure that EisnerAmper is at the lead of the pack of businesses as the Cisco-like predictions regarding the proliferation of video grow into the reality.